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6 years ago…

6 years ago I went to Brunel University for a Computing Taster Day, having not decided what I was going to do at uni yet or what uni to go to, but that day I decided both those things!

Crazy how time flies, I’ve finished my degree and am working in tech, if it wasn’t for events like that I don’t know where I’d be or what I would have done. That’s why putting effort back into promoting STEM has best interest for everybody!

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This week’s #wamimh

My week summed up: Early mornings, awful drives home, free lunch and nice work campus walks 🤓

Now for the weekend, seeing my boyfriend and relaxing before doing it all again next week!

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#WAMIMH Day 1

Walk a month in my heels day 1… got to work early, 6 meetings done ✅, couple of powerpoints created and out for dinner and crazy golf with two other grads 👌 now off to bed 😴

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Your Help

It’s with great pleasure (and amazement) that I say I have over 1500+ followers over 4 social media platforms, but I’d love to grow this even further, so that IT Girl can try to help one more girl out there into STEM and to grow a bigger network at the same time. So please share http://www.TashaITGirl.com on any platform you see fit, or if you have any ideas it would be great to collaborate with 🤓 Thank you x

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First Journeyman Dinner

Great evening at the WCIT Journeyman Dinner, it’s great that a charitable and well established livery company and the men and women who make it so great, care so much about mentoring the younger members! Very appreciated and I look forward to giving back how I can too!

If you’re interested in learning more about the WCIT, then feel free to get in contact or check out their website 🤓

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#DoIT – Jobs

It wasn’t until I started looking for my placement year jobs that I learnt what roles in IT actually were and what was expected. The IT industry is so vast, just saying you work “in tech” doesn’t really narrow it down! For me personally, I think IT jobs are split into three types: 1) Hardware, 2) Software, 3) Business-Facing (which is what my placement and graduate job is in, as I identify myself more as a people person)

It is good to understand a bit about different jobs in IT and to do work experience, which innovative apps such as Placer, can help you with! But how do you know what to apply for if you don’t know what the job role is all about?

Target Postgrad, have come up with a brilliant explanation of different IT job roles and responsibilities, see below a selection or you can view the full article here.

1)Hardware

Technical Support: These are the professional troubleshooters of the IT world. Many technical support specialists work for hardware manufacturers and suppliers solving the problems of business customers or consumers, but many work for end-user companies supporting, monitoring and maintaining workplace technology and responding to users’ requests for help. Some lines of support require professionals with specific experience and knowledge, but tech support can also be a good way into the industry for graduates.

Network Engineer: Network engineering is one of the more technically demanding IT jobs. Broadly speaking the role involves setting up, administering, maintaining and upgrading communication systems, local area networks and wide area networks for an organisation. Network engineers are also responsible for security, data storage and disaster recovery strategies. It is a highly technical role and you’ll gather a hoard of specialist technical certifications as you progress. A telecoms or computer science-related degree is needed.

2)Software

Software Engineer: The work of a software engineer typically includes designing and programming system-level software: operating systems, database systems, embedded systems and so on. They understand how both software and hardware function. The work can involve talking to clients and colleagues to assess and define what solution or system is needed, which means there’s a lot of interaction as well as full-on technical work. Software engineers are often found in electronics and telecommunications companies. A computing, software engineering or related higher degree is often needed.

Web Developer: Web development is a broad term and covers everything to do with building websites and all the infrastructure that sits behind them. The job is still viewed as the trendy side of IT years after it first emerged. These days web development is pretty technical and involves some hardcore programming as well as the more creative side of designing the user interfaces of new websites. The role can be found in organisations large and small.

3)Business-Facing

Business Analyst: Business analysts are true midfielders, equally happy talking with technology people, business managers and end users. They identify opportunities for improvement to processes and business operations using information technology. The role is project based and begins with analysing a customer’s needs, gathering and documenting requirements and creating a project plan to design the resulting technology solution. Business analysts need technology understanding, but don’t necessarily need a technical degree.

Technical Consultant: The term ‘consultant’ can be a tagline for many IT jobs, but typically technical consultants provide technical expertise to, and develop and implement IT systems for, external clients. They can be involved at any or all stages of the project lifecycle: pitching for a contract; refining a specification with the client team; designing the system; managing part or all of the project; after sales support… or even developing the code. A technical degree is preferred, but not always necessary.

Project Manager: Project managers organise people, time and resources to make sure information technology projects meet stated requirements and are completed on time and on budget. They may manage a whole project from start to finish or manage part of a larger ‘programme’. It isn’t an entry-level role: project managers have to be pretty clued up. This requires experience and a good foundation of technology and soft skills, which are essential for working with tech development teams and higher-level business managers.

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Bridging The Confidence Gap

The Enterprise Director at Vodafone UK, feels passionate that it is not only about the need to encourage more girls into IT/STEM, but to help boost their confidence that their skill sets do match the skills needed for STEM. I think this is very important.

It is as much about smashing the STEM stereotype, as it is the glass ceiling.

There are many organisations like CodeFirst: Girls and Stemettes aiming to do this, but what can you?

Take a look 🙂

https://www.computing.co.uk/ctg/opinion/3031171/to-see-more-girls-in-stem-we-must-boost-their-confidence-not-interest