Link

Do you care about screen time?

Take a look:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-47910524

Advertisements
Link

Age-Restricted Like and Stream Limits?

I was reading this article on the like and stream limit that the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) want to implement to restriction to under 18’s. Although I agree that more needs to be done from a governance level towards the usage of social media; I personally feel that instead of putting in place limits such as, age limits, won’t that just mean more children lie about their age… leading to even greater consequences?

Before limitations are put in place, there needs to be a greater effort at educating children on how to use social media safely and securely, allowing them to flourish in technology, but with the emotional equipment to do so.

Take a look:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-47933521

Aside

Things To Consider When Applying To A Graduate Scheme

Did you graduate this year or will be graduating next year?

If so, STEM graduate schemes will start to open from now… and you definitely need to apply NOW before you get too bogged down in your final year of university.

I know you are busy, trust me I was too and it is a long process, but I applied to over 20 graduate schemes in early September/October and by mid-December I had my graduate scheme confirmed at Whitbread, which took a lot of pressure off and I could completely concentrate on my final year and smashing my dissertation!

Before you start applying, it is best to understand where you can see yourself working, especially if you have not worked in the industry you are applying for or do not know what to apply for. There are plenty of aptitude tests you can also do, to figure out where you may fit into an organisation.

The 3 key things to focus on when deciding where you fit into an organisation is: 1) What industries do I care about? 2) What roles do I see myself preferring? 3) What size of business do I want to work for?

You also need to consider whether you want to do set rotations or flexible rotations, larger companies often take a larger intake of graduates with set rotations which you may not have as much of a say of where you’re going and what you’re doing, but this may not be what you want and that’s OK. I knew I didn’t want that, that’s why Whitbread is great for me, I am based in one office, I do rotations which are planned between myself, my line manager and HR and I can move around at different paces to gain more experience. Some of my friends from uni are doing consultancy grad schemes, which is where you get trained by one company and then sent to other companies for a fixed amount of time (3 months, 6 months etc) which is fun and you get to experience many companies, but it may inconvenience your travelling etc.

Another thing to consider with graduate schemes is whether they are offering a permanent role or whether you will be contracted for the duration of your graduate scheme. If this is not advertised then I would definitely ask about this, because if you are contracted you may not have a guaranteed job at the end of the graduate scheme.

Before applying to everything, also think about the salary and how you will get to the job and how that will affect your salary, it isn’t very British to talk about money but it is definitely important when budgeting and thinking about your living and work/life balance.

These are the websites that I used which are what companies use to publicise their graduate programmes:

Graduate-jobs.com

Milkround.com

 

Good luck and if you have any questions – feel free to ask 😊

Status

Mimo App

I was thinking about how I could expand my coding knowledge in my spare time, without having to sit at a computer to learn.

So I took a look at the “learn to code” apps on the Apple App Store, and after trying out a few I found that the reviews and the ease of use is in the Mimo App.

So give it a go – it may be for you 🤓 📱

TechCrunch did a great article on their opinion of it: https://techcrunch.com/2016/08/19/mimos-new-app-teaches-you-how-to-code-on-your-iphone/?guccounter=1

Quote

Ravali Reddy – IT Testimonial

Ever since a young age, I’ve always found an interest in maths and science based subjects. Despite there being times when I felt like wanting to pull my hair out of frustration, there was that great feeling of pride and accomplishment at the end of it all when I’d solve an equation or when I’d conduct an experiment.

However, during my GCSEs, I also developed an interest for Business and this further developed during my A-levels when I participated in the “Young Enterprise Challenge”. From this, I picked A-levels based on my interests at the time: Business Studies, Chemistry, Maths and ICT. When looking into university courses, I was keen on further exploring options that would tie in my interest in both Business and Computer Science which naturally then led me to completing a degree in Business Computing. I was eager to start my career in an industry where I could help others and I knew that technology played a vital part in this.

Technology itself intrigued me and I was keen to learn more about the various ways that businesses use technology to provide to their consumers e.g. by using some of the current “buzzwords”; Big Data, Machine Learning and Blockchain, to name a few.

Unlike some of the other sectors, I knew that the opportunities in the IT sector would be limitless and the career prospects were strong therefore it was obvious to me that it was a promising place to begin my career.

By Ravali Reddy

Twitter: @ravalii_
LinkedIn: Ravali Reddy

Website: bit.ly/ravalireddy

Quote

Bekah Hawrot Weigel – IT Testimonial

I got into coding because I was dealing with PTSD and my husband, a web developer recommended I try it.

When I coded, my brain stopped cycling the trauma I had been through. I found the group Moms Can: Code to support me in my motherhood and coding journey and the amazing program at Flatiron School to keep me engaged and part of a wonderful educational community.

And then all the pieces fit together to get me in tech.

 

By Bekah Hawrot Weigel

Twitter: @BekahHW